eBay – a household name worldwide and home to more than 25 million sellers. With over a billion live listings, if you cannot find it on eBay, the chances are good that it cannot be found anywhere.

With humble beginnings as an auction site to help users get rid of their unwanted goods, eBay has gone from one of the many options for online sellers to the preferred option for online sellers.

It’s simple.

You just take a photo of the item and create a listing. You can sell anything that there is a market for – everything from used gum wrappers (I am serious – check it out for yourself) to cars and even airplanes.

Whether you want to sell something new or used, chances are you can find a buyer on eBay. You don’t even have to wait for an auction to wind down either – give people the option to buy immediately by using the appropriate listing.

The site is global with local variations that make it easier to shop in your own country and currency. You can always buy off from the main site if you prefer, but you do have the option of choosing a local site like “eBay Australia“.

E-commerce made extremely easy. That is what eBay really is.

They handle everything for you, from the processing of payment through to helping your listing feature in searches. eBay gathers data on every person who searches for goods, whether they buy or not. And then it uses that data to provide smart options for the client. Goods that match the search criteria at different price levels, or goods that are related to the search term in some way. They use in-page advertising to increase the chances that the person will click through and possibly buy more.

Let’s say that you go in and look for a rattle for your baby. eBay will bring up those options for you. They’ll also start displaying items that people who ran similar searches went on to buy as well. So, before you know it, it’s a couple of hours later, your cart is loaded up and you are spending a lot more than you originally intended.

Okay, in reality, it’s not always quite that easy. Market research shows that a person may not always buy the first time they see an item listed. They might not even buy it the second time. If they see it after that, though, the chances increase – the more touchpoints you have with a product that is being sold, the more readily you will buy it.

eBay uses this logic with its ads. The ads appear in-page on the eBay site. The touchpoints don’t stop there though. You are still going to see those ads when you go to other sites. Let’s say that you go and look for something on Google; you will see ads for those same products in the sidebar. The same goes for when you update your social media.

It’s almost like eBay is following you and trying to entice you back onto its site. It’s not almost like that; it’s exactly like that. They are following you. It’s not a sinister Big Brother thing like what you see in the movies, but there is a definite profit motive there.

In fact, I’d be willing to bet that a large e-commerce company such as eBay knows a lot more about you than the government does. Data mining is essential for a large corporate these days. It is how they know what trends to follow, how they know what you might or might not be willing to buy and how they know what is going to get you back to them and buying more.

And, considering that 432,000 collectible items are sold on a daily basis on eBay, they must be doing something right.

By making things as easy as possible for both the buyer and the seller, it has been able to turn a lot of heads and racked up $9 billion worth of sales in 2016 alone. Now, compared to Amazon’s turnover of $136 billion in 2013, it really looks like a drop in the ocean.

Considering that eBay’s role is nothing more than that of an intermediary, however, it is extremely impressive. That means no need to continuously look for the next big hit product or try to design it, no sitting with stock that never sells; eBay does simply what it does best – manage the connection between buyers and sellers.

This is one particular area that eBay really excels at because it pays attention to what its users – both buyers and sellers – want. It is a highly responsive organization when it comes to client feedback and is constantly looking for ways to ensure that both buyers and sellers have positive experiences and have the right tools to manage their respective shopping experiences in the best possible way.

eBay runs a fine line as a mediator, favoring neither side over the other and is always open to suggestions from both.

This is a company that seems to embrace the serious business person and the eccentric collector alike. Some of the items sold on eBay, like William Shatner’s kidney stone, border on the ridiculous but show the adaptability of the platform.

So, whether you are a slightly eccentric collector or looking for something a bit more mainstream, it’s time to see what you can find on eBay. It’s a collector’s paradise with the widest range of collectible items.

Whether you are looking to add to your own collection, or sell it, or just buy some everyday items, eBay is the online store that has you covered.

It’s easy – click, pay and it’s on its way!